Photo by Mark Payerl

Exile In Guyville by Liz Phair is a track by track response to The Rolling Stones Exile on Main St. Phair has said she tried to treat each track as a response to Mick Jagger’s corresponding track.

Phair elaborated with Rolling Stone in 2010:

So “6’1″ ” equates to “Rocks Off.”
In his lyrics he’s coming back from a night out, he’s doing the walk of shame. It’s early morning, and he runs into someone who he’s obviously had a relationship with. She’s up in the morning because she’s up in the morning like a normal person, and he’s coming home, probably still drugged and delirious — this is what I glean from the lyrics — and she’s giving him the uh huh, you’re obviously sleeping with someone and it isn’t me look, and he’s like, look man, I can’t even get into it because I’m kind of tripping out, I only get the rocks off in the morning — that’s how far gone he is. So I play the part of the woman he runs into on the street, and I’m going like, “Oh yeah, and I hated you, I bet you’ve fallen…” On other songs I would be in agreement instead of arguing with Mick, where I’d be like, yes, I too have seen a rock & roll hero who’s sort of a bum and I think he’s really tragic and beautiful — “Glory.”

You’ve said the dominant emotion fueling this project was determination.
I was so disrespected. Being a woman in music back then, at least the level I was, was like being their bitch. Sit there, look pretty, bring us drinks and we’ll talk about what music is good and bad. And it was almost understood that women’s taste in music was inferior. There were a few ballsy women who would get in there and say, “Well, I think Green River, once they became Soundgarden…” I was so angry about being taken advantage of sexually, being overlooked intellectually. A lot of Exile in Guyville was about an “I’ll show them.” That was a major emotion in my life, pent up for a long time. Even when I was young at dinner tables with the extended family, listening to the men argue and the women sort of sit there — that’s just the way it was back then.

 

“Statford-On-Guy” corresponds with “Shine a Light”

Shine a Light by Jagger/Richards

Saw you stretched out in Room Ten O Nine
With a smile on your face and a tear right in your eye.
Oh, couldn’t see to get a line on you, my sweet honey love.
Berber jewelry jangling down the street,
Making bloodshot eyes at every woman that you meet.
Could not seem to get a high on you, my sweet honey love.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Make every song (you sing) your favorite tune.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Warm like the evening sun.
When you’re drunk in the alley, baby, with your clothes all torn
And your late night friends leave you in the cold gray dawn.
Just seemed too many flies on you, I just can’t brush them off.
Angels beating all their wings in time,
With smiles on their faces and a gleam right in their eyes.
Whoa, thought I heard one sigh for you,
Come on up, come on up, now, come on up now.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Make every song you sing your favorite tune.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Warm like the evening sun.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Make every song you sing your favorite tune.
May the good Lord shine a light on you,
Warm like the evening sun.